What is Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)?

Spread the love

Internet of Things no more needs any introduction. When these IoT capabilities are implemented in the Industrial and Manufacturing space, it becomes Industrial IoT. This technology is an amalgamation of different technologies like machine learning, big data, sensor data, M2M communication, and automation that have existed in the industrial backdrop for many years.

Industrial Internet makes a connected enterprise by merging the information and operational department of the industry. Thus improving visibility, boosting operational efficiency, increases productivity and reduces the complexity of process in the industry. Industrial IoT is a transformative manufacturing strategy that helps to improve quality, safety, productivity in an industry.

The industrial internet of things, or IIoT, is the use of internet of things technologies to enhance manufacturing and industrial processes.

Also known as the industrial internet or Industrie 4.0, IIoT incorporates machine learning and big data technologies to harness the sensor data, machine-to-machine (M2M) communication and automation technologies that have existed in industrial settings for years.

The Industrial Internet of Things originally described the IoT (Internet of Things) as it is used across several industries such as manufacturing, logistics, oil and gas, transportation, energy/utilities, mining and metals, aviation and other industrial sectors and in use cases which are typical to these industries.

The driving philosophy behind IIoT is that smart machines are better than humans at accurately and consistently capturing and communicating real-time data. This data enables companies to pick up on inefficiencies and problems sooner, saving time and money and supporting business intelligence (BI) efforts.

Nowadays, the term, the Industrial Internet of Things, has become increasingly more pervasive in the context of industry as digitization has become a business priority for many organizations. So what is the Industrial Internet of Things?

The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), also known as the Industrial Internet, brings together brilliant machines, advanced analytics, and people at work. It’s the network of a multitude of devices connected by communications technologies that results in systems that can monitor, collect, exchange, analyze, and deliver valuable new insights like never before. These insights can then help drive smarter, faster business decisions for industrial companies.

The IIoT is transforming industry —changing the way industries work. Whether it’s enabling predictive analytics to detect corrosion inside a refinery pipe, or providing real-time production data to uncover additional capacity in a plant, or driving visibility and control over your industrial control systems environment to prevent cyber attacks, the IIoT—and the software solutions powered by it—are driving powerful business outcomes.

The IIoT is part of a larger concept known as the Internet of Things (IoT). The IoT is a network of intelligent computers, devices, and objects that collect and share huge amounts of data. The collected data is sent to a central Cloud-based service where it is aggregated with other data and then shared with end users in a helpful way. The IoT will increase automation in homes, schools, stores, and in many industries.

The application of the IoT to the manufacturing industry is called the IIoT (or Industrial Internet or Industry 4.0). The IIoT will revolutionize manufacturing by enabling the acquisition and accessibility of far greater amounts of data, at far greater speeds, and far more efficiently than before. A number of innovative companies have started to implement the IIoT by leveraging intelligent, connected devices in their factories.

Just like the Internet of Things in general, the Industrial IoT covers many use cases, industries and applications. Initially focusing on the optimization of operational efficiency and rationalization/automation/maintenance, with an important role for the convergence of IT and OT, the Industrial Internet of Things opens plenty of opportunities in automation, optimization, intelligent manufacturing and smart industry, asset permance management, industrial control, moving towards an on demand service model, new ways of servicing customers and the creation of new revenue models, the more mature goal of industrial transformation.

In manufacturing specifically, IIoT holds great potential for quality control, sustainable and green practices, supply chain traceability and overall supply chain efficiency.

Industrial IoT in the earlier mentioned sense was mainly used to make a distinction between the use cases, actual usage and specific technologies as leveraged for initially mainly manufacturing and, later, other industries on one hand and enterprise IoT and consumer IoT applications on the other.

Evolution of IIoT:

Industry 1.0 (1784) – The invention of steam engines kick started the Industry 1.0. However, the manufacturing was purely labor oriented and tiresome.

Industry 2.0 (1870)– The first assembly line production was introduced. This invention was a big relief for the workers as their labor was minimized to the possible extent. Henry Ford the Father of mass production and the assembly line introduced the process in a car manufacturing plant by Ford to improve the productivity using conveyor belt mechanism.

Industry 3.0 (1969)– Involved advancement of electronic technology and industrial robotics. Miniaturization of the circuit boards through programmable logic controllers, Industrial robotics to simplify, automate and increase the production. However, the operations still remained isolated from the entire enterprise.

Industry 4.0 (2010) – The vision of connected enterprise through interconnecting industrial assets through the internet was fulfilled with the introduction of Industry 4.0. The smart devices communicate with each other and create valuable insights. IIoT brought with it the advantages of asset optimization, production integration, smart monitoring, remote diagnosis, intelligent decision making and most importantly the feature of Predictive Maintenance.

What are the Benefits of IIoT?

The IIoT can greatly improve connectivity, efficiency, scalability, time savings, and cost savings for industrial organizations. Companies are already benefitting from the IIoT through cost savings due to predictive maintenance, improved safety, and other operational efficiencies. IIoT networks of intelligent devices allow industrial organizations to break open data silos and connect all of their people, data, and processes from the factory floor to the executive offices. Business leaders can use IIoT data to get a full and accurate view of how their enterprise is doing, which will help them make better decisions.

Challenges of the IIoT

Interoperability and security are probably the two biggest challenges surrounding the implementation of IIoT. A major concern surrounding the Industrial IoT is interoperability between devices and machines that use different protocols and have different architectures. Ignition is an excellent solution for this since it is cross-platform and built on open-source, IT-standard technologies.

Companies need to know that their data is secure. The proliferation of sensors and other smart, connected devices has resulted in a parallel explosion in security vulnerabilities. This is another factor in the rise of MQTT since it is a very secure IIoT protocol.

The Future of the IIoT:

The IIoT is widely considered to be one of the primary trends affecting industrial businesses today and in the future. Industries are pushing to modernize systems and equipment to meet new regulations, to keep up with increasing market speed and volatility, and to deal with disruptive technologies. Businesses that have embraced the IIoT have seen significant improvements to safety, efficiency, and profitability, and it is expected that this trend will continue as IIoT technologies are more widely adopted.

The Ignition IIoT solution greatly improves connectivity, efficiency, scalability, time savings, and cost savings for industrial organizations. It can unite the people and systems on the plant floor with those at the enterprise level. It can also allow enterprises to get the most value from their system without being constrained by technological and economic limitations. For these reasons and more, Ignition offers the ideal platform for bringing the power of the IIoT into your enterprise.

Who coined the term Industrial Internet?

As the premier digital industrial company, As per GE, they have coined the term Industrial Internet in late 2012. It estimates the Industrial Internet could be a $225 billion market by 2020, and has made significant investments in the Industrial Internet. GE is one of the companies that founded the Industrial Internet Consortium to accelerate the development, adoption, and widespread use of interconnected machines and devices, intelligent analytics, and people at work.

The Industrial Internet vs. Internet of Things:

One perspective is to think of the Industrial Internet as connecting machines and devices in industries such as oil and gas, power generation, and healthcare, where there is more at stake or where system failures and unplanned downtime can result in life-threatening or high-risk situations. On the other hand, the Internet of Things tend to include consumer-level devices such as heart monitoring fitness bands or smart home appliances. They are functional and can provide conveniences but do not typically create emergency situations if downtime were to occur.

For example, the Industrial Internet envisions machines that tell operators how to optimize productivity or detect a failure before it occurs, potentially saving companies billions of dollars a year, while the Internet of Things includes connected refrigerators that can purchase more milk and eggs online before they run out

What are businesses doing with the industrial IoT?

Instrumentation for production lines can let companies track and analyze their processes on an enormously granular level, asset tracking can give a quick, accessible overview of a huge amounts of material, and predictive maintenance can save companies big money by addressing problems before they have a chance to become serious – the number of potential use cases is vast, and growing by the day.

The Industrial IoT Consortium lists these 15 possible uses of IIoT:

  • Smart factory warehousing applications
  • Predictive and remote maintenance.
  • Freight, goods and transportation monitoring.
  • Connected logistics.
  • Smart metering and smart grid.
  • Smart city applications.
  • Smart farming and livestock monitoring.
  • Industrial security systems
  • Energy consumption optimization
  • Industrial heating, ventilation and air conditioning
  • Manufacturing equipment monitoring.
  • Asset tracking and smart logistics.
  • Ozone, gas and temperature monitoring in industrial environments.
  • Safety and health (conditions) monitoring of workers.
  • Asset performance management

MeenaG Staff

Internet of Things Enthusiast

Leave a Reply